PrimaryResources.co.uk
Advertisement

Hosted by:
Hosted by RM
Homepage
English
Maths
Science
ICT
History
Geography
Art
Design & Technology
Religious Education
Music
Physical Education
Modern Foreign Languages
Foundation
PSHE & Citizenship
Welsh
Topic/Theme
Seasonal Resources
Behaviour
SEN
EAL
Other
Assembly Resources
Links
Support the site!



Our Other Sites:

..from the creator of Primary Resources

Interactive games for primary students


Blog and Site News
Frequently Asked Questions
Send Feedback
Site Search
Facebook Group

Frequently Asked Questions


Using the Site & Resources

Contributing Resources


Other Questions

 

 

 

What do the level symbols on the site mean?
The level symbols refer to the English primary school year group the contributing teacher originally used the resources with. Any rating is approximate. You should always check the suitability of any resource before using it with your students. The table below shows how the English & Welsh primary year groups relate to other educations systems in English speaking schools.

Foundation Stage
(Early Years)
Key Stage 1
(Infants)
Key Stage 2
(Juniors)

Key Stage 3+

          

England
& Wales

 
Nursery
Reception
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
 
Age:
<4 yrs
4-5yrs
5-6 yrs
6-7 yrs
7-8 yrs
8-9 yrs
9-10 yrs
10-11 yrs
11yrs +
                 
Scotland
Nursery
Primary 1
Primary 2
Primary 3
Primary 4
Primary 5
Primary 6
Primary 7
N. I.
Primary 1
Primary 2
Primary 3
Primary 4
Primary 5
Primary 6
Primary 7
R.O.I.
Jr Infants
Sr Infants
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
US
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Canada
   
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
NZ
 
Year 0
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
 
NZ (Old)
 
New Entrants
Junior 1
Junior 2
Standard 1
Standard 2
Standard 3
Standard 4
 
Australia*
 
Kindergarten
Prep/R'ption
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6

LA = Lower Ability, MA = Middle Ability, HA = Higher Ability
- Resources designed to support learners with English as an additional language
- Resources designed for special schools or for students with special educational needs

Comparisons between different education systems are approximate due to variations in school years. The table has also been compiled using Internet sources. If you teach in one of the countries above and know better then please let us know so we can correct the table. (* Australian year group names vary in different areas)

Approximate Assessment Levels:

 

          

England
& Wales

-
Levels 1-3 during Key Stage Level 2 by end of Key Stage
Levels 2-5 during Key Stage
Level 4 by end of Key Stage
 
Age:
<4 yrs
4-5yrs
5-6 yrs
6-7 yrs
7-8 yrs
8-9 yrs
9-10 yrs
10-11 yrs
11yrs +
                 
Scotland
-
approximately Level A
approximately Level B / C
Level D / E

English/Welsh levels and age groups are used throughout the site, unless expressly stated otherwise.
Any ages stated are approximate. Please see our terms & conditions of use for further details.
Please note, older resources may not align with more recent changes to the National Curriculum in England & Wales


What do the file type symbols on the site mean?
The following table shows what all the different file type symbols on the site stand for. Click on each one for more details.

What are Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) files and how do I read them?
PDF files are Portable Document Format files. They are a file format developed by Adobe that allow print documents to be read by a large number of different types of computers and devices. To read PDF files you need to have Adobe Acrobat Reader (or the equivalent for your machine) installed. You can download the program for free on Adobe's website: http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readermain.html
Some users may experience problems with the Acrobat plug-in after upgrading to a more recent version of Internet Explorer. We recommend you reinstall the plug-in if you experience problems.

There may be printing issues with some of the older PDF files depending on the fonts you have installed on your system. The print output may occasionally be garbled or have letters badly formatted. If you experience these problems you can try copying the text from the PDF file (by highlighting it in the usual way, clicking edit and copy (on a PC)) and pasting it into your word processor where you can change the font and edit it before printing out your own version of the worksheet. Some of the older PDF files do not seem to work correctly with newer versions of Adobe's Acrobat Reader.

What are Word (.doc) files and how do I read them?
Word (.doc) files are documents that have been created using Microsoft Word. If you don't have Microsoft Word then many other word processors open Word documents. Alternatively you can download the free Word viewer from Microsoft Office Online. Search for Word viewer.
Some users may also wish to try the free Open Office software suite. .docx files require Microsoft Office 2007 onwards (or suitable plug-in).

What are Publisher (.pub) files and how do I read them?
Publisher (.pub) files are documents that have been created using Microsoft Publisher. You cannot view Publisher files without owning a copy of Microsoft Publisher.

What are Excel (.xls) files and how do I read them?
Excel (.xls) files are documents that have been created using Microsoft Excel. If you don't have Microsoft Excel then many other spreadsheet packages open Excel documents. Alternatively you can download the free Excel viewer from Microsoft Office Online. Search for Excel viewer. Many of the Excel files on this site use macros to provide interactivity. We recommend that you scan all downloads with an up-to-date virus checker before using them, particularly when you enable features such as macros.
.xlsx files require Microsoft Office 2007 onwards (or suitable plug-in).

What are Powerpoint (.ppt) files and how do I read them?
Powerpoint (.ppt) files are documents that have been created using Microsoft Powerpoint. If you don't have Microsoft Powerpoint then many other presentation packages open Powerpoint documents. Alternatively you can download the free Powerpoint viewer from Microsoft Office Online. Search for Powerpoint viewer. .pptx files require Microsoft Office 2007 onwards (or suitable plug-in).

What are Flash (.swf) files and how do I read them?
Flash (.swf) files are material that have been created using Macromedia Flash. You can view this material online but you need to have installed the free Macromedia Flash browser plug-in.

What are SMART Notebook (.nbk, .xbk or.notebook) files and how do I read them?
SMARTnotebook (.nbk or .xbk or .notebook) files are presentations created for SMART technology's series of boards. The software to view these presentations is free to download (from the Smart website) but please check the terms of use before you install it. Some of the older notebook files on the site have been zipped to prevent problems with downloading and will need to be unzipped before you use them. As well as the free-to-use Smart Notebook Interactive Viewer, Smart now provide a free online version of their software that allows you to view Notebook files: click here to visit the SMART Express website.

What are Easiteach (.et) files and how do I read them?
Easiteach (.et) files are presentations created using RM's Easiteach program. Click these links for a free Easiteach file reader (PC & Mac): Location 1 / Location 2 / Location 3 / Location 4

What are Textease (.te) files and how do I read them?
Textease (.te) files are documents created using the Textease Studio of programs. A free viewer (PC) for this file format is available here.

What are ActiveBoard (.flp) files and how do I read them?
ActivBoard (.flp) files are presentations created using Promethean's interactive whiteboard programs ActivPrimary and ActivBoard. These pieces of software have been superceeded by Promethean's ActivInspire which can be downloaded from the Promethean website. The new software will open legacy .flp files and there is a free "personal use" version available after registration. ActivInspire also imports Smart Notebook and Powerpoint format presentations.

What are .exe files and how do I use them?
(.exe) files are Microsoft Windows program files.

What are .odt files and how do I use them?
(.odt) files are documents that have been created using the free Open Office software. You can download a copy here but many of these files also open with other programs you may already have such as Microsoft Office.

What are the other file types and how do I use them?
(.pages) files have been created using and can be opened with Apple's Pages software on Mac or iOS devices.
(.keynote) files are slideshow presentation documents that have been created using and can be opened with Apple's Keynote software on Mac or iOS devices.
(.numbers) files are spreadsheet documents that have been created using and can be opened with Apple's Numbers software on Mac or iOS devices.


What do the other symbols on the site mean?

- resource translated into Welsh
- interactive whiteboard / data projector teaching resource
- resource designed to match the New Primary National Strategy Frameworks (UK)
- resource designed to match the 2014 changes to the National Curriculum in England & wales
- Scottish Primary level reference
- New Zealand level reference




Advertisements:

In Association with Amazon.co.uk





©1997-2014 Primary Resources - Click here for Terms and Conditions - Help / About Us - Key to Symbols - Contact - Advertising - Cookies -Top of Page